How to Train Your Cat to Walk On a Leash

One of the struggles that cat lovers deal with is training their cat to walk on a leash. Well, I am assuming that by now, you might be asking “Train a cat to walk on a leash? Is that even possible?” The answer is YES definitely, there are cat lovers who are constantly training their cats to walk on a leash, and another YES, cats can be trained to walk on a leash, believe it or not. Being able to train your cat to walk on a leash can be both beneficial for your cat and yourself – it improves the life of your cat through extra exercises, it cultivates their skills, and of course, it creates a quality bonding time between you and your cat.

Leash training can be done no matter how old your cat is, however, just like humans, cats can be easily trained while it’s still young. Kittens are more outgoing, social and comfortable than older cats which makes them easier to train walking on a leash. Here are the 5 steps on how to train your cat to walk on a leash effectively:


STEP 1 – LOOK FOR AN APPROPRIATE HARNESS

Looking for an appropriate harness can be a little tricky. This will require you to find a harness that is a perfect fit for your cat. Consider a harness that will support the chest, front legs, and the middle of your cat instead of a harness with just a leash and collar alone. There is a possibility that you may end up getting a pack of harnesses, but that’s okay since it’s for the safety and comfort of your cat.


STEP 2 – SET UP A “HARNESS THIS IS KITTY, KITTY THIS IS HARNESS” SCENARIO

Once you have chosen the appropriate harness for your cat, introduce it to him very slowly – give him some ‘getting to know each other’ moment with his harness by allowing him to sniff and play with it until they get along. It’s also a good idea to reward him with some treats as it will associate a positive relationship with the harness.

When you feel like he’s comfortable with the harness already, buckle it up and give him some time to move around the house. Observe how he reacts or moves with the harness buckled on him. Make sure that it’s not too tight or too loose, just enough for him to move freely and comfortably.


STEP 3 – FIND THE BEST TIME TO ATTACH THE LEASH

I know how satisfying it is to see that your cat get along with his harness and I understand how you get too excited about walking and playing outside, but it’s not yet the right time to go alfresco. Although your cat is already comfortable moving with the harness on him, it doesn’t guarantee that it will be the same once outside. Practice walking inside the house for some time by simply holding the leash up without any pressure and follow your cat as he moves or runs around the house.

The leash should be at least 3 feet long to make sure that your cat can move with ease. Training can become tiring to your kitty so always see to it that treats and water are available all throughout the training.


STEP 4 – PLAN YOUR FIRST OUTDOOR ADVENTURE

Now that he’s comfortable moving inside the house with the harness on him, it’s time to plan the very first outdoor adventure. Planning is crucial for the first outdoor experience as it may either entertain or traumatize your cat. Yes, it can be a traumatizing experience for your cat if that experience will involve shocking stimuli such as cars, dogs, and even people.

That being said, first outdoor adventure should be planned smoothly particularly the location. It should be somewhere safe, secure, and a place where your cat will feel relaxed. A semi-private place is ideal as you don’t have to worry a lot about cars, dogs, and people.


STEP 5 – YOU AND YOUR KITTY SHOULD BE BOTH PREPARED

Now that you’ve planned your first outdoor adventure, it’s time to be prepared about what’s coming next. First of all, make sure that the harness and leash are properly secured just in case he’ll outbursts. Carry him and let him observe the location first before putting him down. Once he’s down, allow him to sniff and roll over the grass, and slowly initiate a walk. Just allow him to do things he cannot do at home but pay extra attention so everything will go smoothly as planned.

You can’t be any prouder to see your cat enjoying the outside world but it is recommended to have his first outdoor experience short but fruitful one. This way, he’ll want it more and look forward to the next one.


CONCLUSION

Everyone is different, and cats are no exception. Some cats might be easier to train leash walking, but for some cats, it’s not their cup of tea. If the first outdoor experience didn’t turn out as planned, that’s okay. Don’t force your kitty to do things he’s not happy doing. Maybe he’s not yet ready or he’s not in a good mood that day, who knows? Nevertheless, it doesn’t mean that the first trial didn’t go well, the next ones will be the same. You can try again and again, but make every trial more exciting as you go further by adding special treats. Take it easy on him and you’ll soon realize that it’s all worth it.

This training should be both comfortable to you and of course, to your cat. You need to start building a good foundation that you and your cat will enjoy doing together. Walking on a leash vary from cat to cat – while some learn faster, some may require extra attention (and patience). Startup with baby steps and reward them if they do something good. This will motivate them to do better in the future.

Walking on a leash especially outside is not a thing of every cat. Attempting to walk your cat on a leash outside without any consideration can be dangerous to him that’s why it’s very necessary to take some basics into account before anything so that it will be a successful bonding of you and your cat.

The Secret to Understanding Your Cats Body Language

A lot of people think that cats are intelligent and mysterious creatures that can see through your soul, which may also seem that they are hard to understand. But that isn’t exactly true as you can actually figure out what they are thinking by their body language.

There are many ways on how you can read your cat’s thoughts. Aside from their body language, you can also read them by the movement of their tail and ears. If you have noticed the sudden change of behavior of your cat, try averting your attention to him because he is trying to tell you something.

Guide to Understanding Your Cat’s Body language

You may have noticed the constant changes in your cat’s movements and behavior towards you, however, you don’t know how to decipher what kind of message that your cat is trying to tell you.

In this article, we will guide you on how to understand your cat’s body language right from their tail to their eyes. In this way, you’ll know what they are feeling, what their needs are, and their desires.

Here’s how you can understand your cat to have a better cat and owner relationship:


1. Cat Uses their Eyes to Communicate

Cat’s eyes are big, beautiful, mesmerizing, and kind of mysterious. However, looking into your cat’s eyes can offer you clues on how they are feeling about the environment around them.

Here’s how you can read your cat through their eyes:

  • Slow Blinking

If you notice that your cat is looking at you while slowly blinking, it indicates that your pet feels comfortable, safe, and trusts you. You can give her a treat or pet her as a way of saying “thank you”.

  • Constricted Pupils

If your cat has constricted pupils, you should be careful around her because she might scratch or bite if you touch her so suddenly. Constricted pupils indicate that your cat may be tense or may possibly feel aggressive.

If you want to grab or touch your cat in this kind of state, approach her slowly and make your presence known to avoid getting yourself hurt.

  • Dilated Pupils

If your cat is scared, stimulated, or surprised their pupils dilate.

  • Half-Closed Eyes

If your cat’s eyes are half closed, this indicates that she is in a relaxed state and is a trusting cat.

  • Staring at You

If you notice that your cat is staring right at you, it may be a sign that she is trying to challenge you at something, it may also be a sign that she wants to play with you.


2. Ears are Not Just for Hearing

Aside from hearing, cat ears can also help you out in trying to understand your cat’s behavior. Try to pay attention to your cat’s ears to know your pet’s current mood.

Here’s how you can decipher the ear positions of your cat:

  • Ears in a Straight Up Position

If your cat is alert in it’s surrounding, its ears would most likely stand in position as well.

  • Ears Turned Back or Sideways

Be cautious around your pet if its ears are in this position, this is a sign that your pet feels anxious or nervous at something.

  • Ears in a Forward Position

If your cat’s ears are in a forward position, it is a sign that your cat feels contented or maybe even playful.

  • Ears Turned Back

Be careful if its ears are in this kind of position, this indicates that your cat is over-stimulated or irritated at something. It would be better if you leave it alone for a while.

  • Ears back and Flat on the Head

This is a sure sign that your cat is feeling defensive or scared. However, it may also be a sign that it is angry or may even be aggressive. Be careful if your cat’s ears are in this position.


3. Cat Tails Are the Most Common Way of Communicating to Humans

Watching the movement of your cat’s tail is one of the most common ways in deciphering the mood of your pet. And also the easiest way in trying to understand what your cat is feeling.

Here’s what the various tail positions mean in cat body language:

  • Tail in a Down Position

If a cat’s tail is down it may indicate that your pet is scared, threatened, or may be focused at something.

  • The tail is Moving Rapidly Back and Forth

Unlike dogs, if a cat is wagging its tail it doesn’t mean that it is happy or being playful. A fast-thumping tail may indicate that your cat is feeling agitated. It would be best if you leave your cat alone to not agitate it more.

  • Tail in an Upward Position

This indicates that your cat is happy and feeling cheerful, they are much easier to approach if their tail is in this kind of position.

  • Upright Bottle-Brush Tail Stance

If you see your cat’s tail in an upright position and looks like a bottle-brush, it means that your cat is feeling threatened. If it is combined with an arched back, upright hair along its spine, and claws unsheathed, it would be safer for you to back off from the cat to prevent it from attacking you.

  • Tucked Below or In-Between the Legs

This signifies that your cat is insecure or feeling anxious.

  • The tail is Curled Around Your Legs or on Another Cat’s Tail

If you noticed that your pet’s tail is curled around your legs, it signifies that your pet is being friendly.

  • The tail is Moving Back and Forth Slowly

If your cat is trying to decipher about the current situation he tends to move his tail back and forth slowly, while also thinking about how he should feel about it.


Conclusion:

There would be several more forms of body languages that your cat might show in displaying its feelings. Therefore, take time to decipher and understand the various ways of how your cat communicates with you. This way, you’ll immediately understand what he needs or what his moods currently are. Trying to understand your cat will also help you have a better relationship with your pet.

This is Why It Matters Where You Put Your Cats Litter Box

Unlike dogs, cats don’t need to be potty trained. Cats naturally do their business on places that have a sand-like substance where they can paw right through it. And that’s when a litter box comes into use.

Where you place your cat’s litter box plays an important role, so if you have placed it in the wrong place, your cat might just do their business on your carpet, or on any other inappropriate places. Here’s why it matters where you put your cat’s litter box.


1. Placing Litter Boxes Near Food

One of the cat’s survival instincts is to not eliminate near where they eat, sleep, or raise their young ones. This is to prevent the scent of her waste from attracting predators that might harm her and her kittens.

The reason why cats cover their waste is to prevent them from being detected by predators. Therefore, if you place their litter box near their feeding station, they’ll probably not use the litter box and just choose to eliminate somewhere else.


2. Place it in a Secure Place

If a cat doesn’t feel safe on its own litter box, there would be no reason for her to use the litter box again. If you have more than one cat in your household that ambushes another cat in the box, or maybe a dog that goes after her or barks at her while eliminating, or any other reasons that make her feel anxious for her safety, your cat will seek out for other options.

So make sure to place it where she can’t be disturbed by your kids, or from any other pets that you have in your household.


3. Don’t Place it on Uncomfortable Places

The litter box’s location should be about the convenience of your pet and not yours. Don’t place the box where your cat needs to squeeze itself through a pet door, or from other furniture before they can get to their boxes, especially if your cat’s a senior.

Keep in mind that older cats have limited mobility, which makes it harder for them to reach their boxes, unlike their younger years. So make sure to place it somewhere that provides ease and comfort of use for them.


4. Don’t Make it Too Private

Some cat owners think that cats also need their privacy when doing their thing, which makes them place their pet’s litter box in closed places such as the cabinets or drawers. Cats, however, don’t need much privacy as you think.

As long as your cat feels safe when eliminating should be enough for them. There’s no need for you to place it on hard to reach places, you may even tend to forget about it if you placed it on an isolated place, so make sure to look for a location that is easy for the both of your to access it.


5. Keep the Box’s Odor at Bay

Do not consider placing your pet’s litter box in a small enclosed place such as cabinets or closets. Your cat would not be the only one having a hard time getting out from the cabinet, but also the odor.

The odor may be bearable to you, but not to your cat. Remember, animals have a stronger sense of smell than us humans. So if the cabinet where placed your pet’s box smells to offensive for them, they’ll avoid going to their boxes. Therefore, place the box in well-ventilated areas.


6. Choose a Quiet Area

Another mistake that cat owners do is by placing the litter box in the basement, and most basements are where the washing machine or water tank is located. Another bad location is by placing it in the garage area.

Avoid placing the litter box in noisy places as this will disrupt your cat’s business, it would also scare them away from their litter box. Place it in a quiet area where they can eliminate in peace.


Conclusion:

Cats don’t need much privacy when eliminating, unlike us humans. However, they would want to eliminate in an area that is comfortable, peaceful, and very accessible to them. And one of the best places that you can put your cat’s litter box would be the kitchen, the place where you cook your food.

The kitchen is not too noisy for your pet and very accessible to both of you. Just make sure to place it somewhere that is not near from where you cook and where you eat.

This is How Cleaning Your Cats Litter Box Will Make You Both Healthier

Poorly maintaining your cat’s litter box is often the cause of litter box destruction, and it is also one of the reasons why a cat ends up in a shelter is because they refuse to use the litter box. Before you consider bringing your cat into a shelter, you should think about if you are maintaining their boxes well.

We humans don’t like taking a dump on stinky, dirty bathrooms, and this is similar to cats. Therefore, you should regularly clean their litter box for both of your convenience. Not only will it be convenient for both of you, but it would also make you both healthy.

Proper Litter Box Maintenance

Automated litter boxes are gaining popularity because they lessen your effort in maintaining your pet’s litter box. However, their selling prices are too expensive to most cat owners, so we’ll just focus on the less expensive and non-automated litter box.

Here’s how you clean your cat’s litter box for better health:


1. Place the Box In a Safe Accessible Place

Consider placing the box in an area with maximum privacy, and make sure that it is far from loud appliances and have an easy escape route, just in case you have another cat that likes to bully other cats.

Make it accessible for both you and your cat so that you can easily clean it daily.


2. Litter Box Liners

Using a litter box liner is a personal preference, if you are using a non-scoping litter, then you can consider using a liner for easy disposal when it’s time to wash the box. This is a definite advantage for those who don’t use a scooping litter, however, you need to change the litter much frequently.


3. Place a Mat Around the Litter Box’s Area

The litter tends to get stuck on your cat’s paw which will lead it to scatter around the house. Therefore, you should place a mat around the litter box to catch the excess sand on your catch paw. You can then just shake off the collected litter on the mat after a week.


 4. Use a Scoop

Consider using a clumping litter so that you can scoop out the urine that has turned into a solid chunk. The poop can also be easily scooped out as it is nicely coated in the litter and won’t stick on the scooper.

If you are using a crystal litter, you should use a scoop with larger holes to easily sieve the clean litter. While for a fine-grained litter, you’ll need a scoop with a narrower sieve to prevent the small clumps of urine from filtering back into the litter box.


5. Use Deodorizing Products

Cats have more sensitive smell than humans, so if you think that the litter box doesn’t smell or seems reasonably clean to you, for your cat it doesn’t. Cats don’t like doing their business in a smelly area, or in a dirty litter box, which is why cleaning the litter box daily is very important.

As for the smell, you can get rid of it by placing a half-lemon in a dish near the litter box. Placing an open bowl of vinegar, a charcoal air filter, or a box of baking soda near the litter box would also work well. Natural solutions work best for finicky cats.


6. Clean the Litter Box Once a Week

Aside from scooping and deodorizing the area, you should also wash and disinfect the litter box at least once a week. Pre-soak it with a disinfectant and then put a baking soda in it for at least 10 minutes.

After that, hose it out in your backyard and dry it up with a paper towel. The mat and the surrounding area of the litter box should also be disinfected and cleaned with a sweep.


7. Ideal Litter Schedule

For an ideal maintenance, scoop the litter box at least twice a day to easily manage the smell. You may not be able to stick with this kind of plan, but it would really help in managing the odor.

Also, change the litter once a week for a cleaner and fresher litter box for your cat.


Conclusion:

If you continually maintain your cat’s litter box every day, not only will it make you both happy, but it would also keep both of you healthy. Having a dirty, smelly litter box can cause your cat to gain diseases, not only are your cat’s health is at risk, but yours as well.

With filthy litter boxes, you’ll be then exposed to ammonia, bacterial infections, and even parasite transfer.